Economic Impact Report
New York City

Summary

Airbnb has always been focused on helping travelers belong anywhere and giving hosts the chance to welcome people from around the world and earn a little extra money to pay the bills. We want more people to understand who we are, what we’re all about and how we help communities around the world.

We already know our community in New York is made up of hard working families in all five boroughs who, during a time of economic inequality, depend on home sharing as an economic lifeline. Our hosts come from all walks of life — they are teachers, small business owners, students, and retirees — and surveys tells us that:

  • 78% of Airbnb hosts in New York earn low, moderate, or middle incomes.
  • 72% of Airbnb hosts in New York use the money they earn sharing their space to stay in their homes.
  • 36% of Airbnb hosts in New York City have unsteady incomes. Many are freelancers, part-time workers, or students.
  • Airbnb supports small business entrepreneurs. 11% of hosts said they used Airbnb to support themselves while launching a new business.

In November of 2015, Airbnb released the Airbnb Community Compact, a comprehensive document outlining our continued commitment to work with cities around the world on responsible rules for home sharing. In the Compact, we pledge to work collaboratively with cities, to treat every city personally and help ensure our community pays its fair share of hotel and tourist taxes, build an open and transparent community, and promote responsible home sharing to make cities stronger.

As part of our Compact, we pledged to release anonymized data about our hosts and guests so that policymakers can make informed decisions about home sharing in their communities.

Today, we are honoring our Compact by making available more than 170,000 rows of data about almost 60,000 listings in our community in New York City. We are making this data available to help policymakers craft smart rules for home sharing. Home sharing is an economic lifeline for the middle class. A typical listing earns $5,110 a year, and is typically shared less than 4 nights per month. We want to work together to both protect the hard working New Yorkers who depend on Airbnb to make ends meet and address the city’s policy concerns.

The data includes anonymized information about every active Airbnb listing in New York City as of November 17, 2015, as well as information about every listing in New York City that hosted a trip in the past year. The data underscores that home sharing supports families in all five boroughs and makes clear that illegal hotels are not welcome on Airbnb.

Highlights from the data include:

  • 95% of our entire home hosts share only one listing.
  • 99% of all entire home properties listed on the platform are shared by hosts with one or two listings (95% share one listing, 4% share two listings).
  • 90% of our hosts have indicated in a survey that the property they list is their permanent home.
  • The median supplemental homesharing income for an Airbnb host in New York City is $5,110.
  • Just under 36,000 listings in New York City are currently listed on the platform.
  • The Airbnb community is spread throughout the city with 13,800 active listings in Brooklyn, 13,400 active listings in Outer Manhattan, 5,300 active listings in Central Manhattan, 2,500 active listings in Queens, 430 active listings in the Bronx, and 200 active listings in Staten Island.
  • The vast majority of listings are shared only occasionally. The median number of nights booked per listing in the past year is 42, with 84% of listings shared less than 120 days per year and 78% of listings shared for less than 90 days per year.

We hope this data will provide additional facts and insight to everyone who is interested in responsible home sharing in New York City. We remain committed to working with policymakers and elected officials on clear, fair rules for home sharing. Additionally, we strongly oppose large-scale speculators who turn dozens of apartments into illegal hotel rooms. Illegal hotels  are not in the interests of our guests, our hosts, our company, or the cities where Airbnb hosts share their space.

Middle class families in all five boroughs depend on Airbnb to pay the bills and stay in their homes. We look forward to working with everyone to protect the middle class.

Data Overview

The data made available is current as of November 17, 2015 and covers every active Airbnb listing in New York City, as well as any listings that have had a booking in the past twelve months (November 1, 2014 – November 1, 2015; regardless of whether they are currently active or inactive). The data includes:

  • Type of listing: entire home or shared space.
  • Information regarding the number of nights the listing was shared.
  • Information regarding host earnings per listing.
  • Information on the number of listings in each zip code in New York City.
  • Information on the median number of nights that listings in each zip code in New York city were shared.1
  • Information on the typical amount of money listings in each zip code in New York City earn.2

The data is anonymized to protect our community’s privacy and is available for review by elected officials, members of the media and the public. Consumers expect and deserve that online platforms will protect their privacy. Some have demanded detailed personal information about Airbnb users, including individual IP addresses and the home address of middle class New Yorkers who share their space. Providing this data to the public would violate privacy rights, potentially expose hard working families to the risk of identity theft and would not assist New York leaders as they seek to craft sound policies.

Listings by Borough

As of November 17, 2015 there were 35,966 active Airbnb listings in New York. Listings are spread across all five boroughs:

Active Listings

Borough Entire Home Private Room or Shared Space
Brooklyn 6,619 7,203
Staten Island 75 129
Central Manhattan 3,325 1,994
Outer Manhattan 8,641 4,796
Queens 965 1,565
Bronx 117 314
Total 19,742 16,001

Most Hosts Share Only One Entire Home Listing

The overwhelming majority of our hosts who share their entire home or apartment share only one listing. The chart below shows the number of hosts who share one active entire home listing compared to the number of hosts who share more than one active entire home listing:

Number of Hosts Who Share More Than One Active Entire Home Listing

Number of Active Listings Per Host Brooklyn Staten Island Central Manhattan Outer Manhattan Queens Bronx
1 5,814 56 2,874 7,325 872 95
2 250 8 96 250 30 8
3 50 1 24 57 2 2
4 8 8 23 4
5 2 6 10 1
6 or more 5 1 11 28 2 1
Total Number of Hosts 6,129 66 3,019 7,693 911 106

Many hosts who share more than one listing operate short-term rentals that are available for a minimum of 30 days. Eight percent of entire home listings (roughly 1,600) in New York can only be rented for 30 days or more. Others include a hotel that provides travelers with a unique, local experience and utilizes the Airbnb platform.

When we examine revenue earned by Airbnb hosts that share an entire home, we find that hosts with one entire home listing earned the overwhelming percentage of revenue.

Percent of Revenue Earned by Hosts Who Share an Entire Home
November 2014 – November 2015 3

Active Hosts and Inactive Hosts
Actual 2014-15 Proportions
Active Hosts Only
Projected 2015-16 Proportions
Percent of Revenue Earned by Hosts With One Entire Home Listing 59% 86%
Percent of Revenue Earned by Hosts With Two Entire Home Listings 16% 7%
Percent of Revenue Earned by Hosts With Three Entire Home Listings 8% 3%
Percent of Revenue Earned by Hosts With Four Entire Home Listings 6% 1%
Percent of Revenue Earned by Hosts With Five Entire Home Listings 3% 0%
Percent of Revenue Earned by Hosts With Six or More Entire Home Listings 7% 2%

Most Listings Are Shared Only Occasionally

The overwhelming majority of Airbnb hosts are sharing the home in which they live on an occasional basis, such as when they leave town for work or vacation. The median number of nights booked per listing in the past year in New York City is 42 and varies by borough.

Median Nights Booked Per Listing in the Past Year 4

Borough Median Nights Booked: Entire Home Listings Median Nights Booked: Private Room and Shared Space Listings Median Nights Booked: All Listings
Queens 43 63 53
Brooklyn 36 48 41
Outer Manhattan 40 48 42
Central Manhattan 36 56 41
Staten Island 36 95 61
Bronx 34 82 54
New York City Total 43 63 53

Most Hosts Earn a Small, But Substantial Amount of Supplemental Income

The median Airbnb host (that had at least one booking) earned $5,110 in the past year. This modest but substantial amount of money is an economic lifeline for families. 72 percent of Airbnb hosts reported to us in a survey that they depend on their Airbnb income to stay in their home.

Median Annual Airbnb Host Earnings 5

Borough Median Annual Airbnb Earnings
Queens $4,138
Brooklyn $3,962
Outer Manhattan $6,558
Central Manhattan $5,445
Staten Island $5,221
Bronx $3,249
New York City, All $5,110

Airbnb is a young company, we are constantly learning, and our efforts to review and strengthen our community in New York are ongoing. We hope this data and information will inform everyone who cares about home sharing in New York and look forward to working with policymakers in a constructive fashion as we move forward.


  1. Information for zip codes with less than 25 listings is omitted to ensure personal data regarding our hosts remains anonymous.
  2. Information for zip codes with less than 25 listings is omitted to ensure personal data regarding our hosts remains anonymous.
  3. Data is rounded.
  4. Includes all listings that had a booking in the past year. Includes listings that were active as of the start of the one year study period in order to provide the most representative picture of annual hosting activity.
  5. ibid